Francie Stoutamire Photography | The Hill of Tara and Newgrange
27 photos

The Hill of Tara, located near the River Boyne, is an archaeological complex that runs between Navan and Dunshaughlin in County Meath, Ireland. It was once the ancient seat of power in Ireland – 142 kings are said to have reigned there in prehistoric and historic times. In ancient Irish religion and mythology it was the sacred place of dwelling for the gods, and was the entrance to the otherworld. Saint Patrick is said to have come to Tara to confront the ancient religion of the pagans at its most powerful site.
Newgrange is a Stone Age monument in the Boyne Valley, County Meath, Ireland. Newgrange was constructed over 5,000 years ago (about 3,200 B.C.) during the Neolithic period, which makes it older than Stonehenge and the Great Pyramids of Giza. Newgrange is a large circular mound with a stone passageway and chambers inside. The mound is ringed by 97 large kerbstones. It is best known for the illumination of its passage and chamber by the winter solstice sun.

We passed lots of ornate and colorful doors while touring through Dublin.

We passed lots of ornate and colorful doors while touring through Dublin.

Looking south at a Neolithic passage tomb known as Dumha na nGiall (the Mound of the Hostages), which was constructed around 3,400 BC on the Hill of Tara.

Looking south at a Neolithic passage tomb known as Dumha na nGiall (the Mound of the Hostages), which was constructed around 3,400 BC on the Hill of Tara.

Looking north at a Neolithic passage tomb known as Dumha na nGiall (the Mound of the Hostages), which was constructed around 3,400 BC on the Hill of Tara.

Looking north at a Neolithic passage tomb known as Dumha na nGiall (the Mound of the Hostages), which was constructed around 3,400 BC on the Hill of Tara.

A ruined 15th century church known locally as Skryne Tower as seen in the distance east of the Hill of Tara.

A ruined 15th century church known locally as Skryne Tower as seen in the distance east of the Hill of Tara.

Grave marker for some 400 Irish dead in the 1798 rebellion.

Grave marker for some 400 Irish dead in the 1798 rebellion.

Jim and the view to the south from the Hill of Tara. In the foreground is the Lia Fáil (Stone of Destiny) that is on the Inauguration Mound.

Jim and the view to the south from the Hill of Tara. In the foreground is the Lia Fáil (Stone of Destiny) that is on the Inauguration Mound.

Panorama looking east across the Hill of Tara with an oval Iron Age hilltop enclosure, enclosed by an internal ditch and external bank.

Panorama looking east across the Hill of Tara with an oval Iron Age hilltop enclosure, enclosed by an internal ditch and external bank.

Celtic cross on the Hill of Tara commemorating the Battle of Tara Hill that was fought on the evening of May 26, 1798 between British forces and Irish rebels involved in the Irish Rebellion of 1798.

Celtic cross on the Hill of Tara commemorating the Battle of Tara Hill that was fought on the evening of May 26, 1798 between British forces and Irish rebels involved in the Irish Rebellion of 1798.

Interior of the Neolithic passage tomb known as Dumha na nGiall (the Mound of the Hostages), which was constructed around 3,400 BC on the Hill of Tara.

Interior of the Neolithic passage tomb known as Dumha na nGiall (the Mound of the Hostages), which was constructed around 3,400 BC on the Hill of Tara.

Entrance to a small Neolithic passage tomb known as Dumha na nGiall (the Mound of the Hostages), which was constructed around 3,400 BC on the Hill of Tara.

Entrance to a small Neolithic passage tomb known as Dumha na nGiall (the Mound of the Hostages), which was constructed around 3,400 BC on the Hill of Tara.

St. Patrick's Church built in 1822 on the site of an older church on the Hill of Tara.

St. Patrick's Church built in 1822 on the site of an older church on the Hill of Tara.

Interior of St. Patrick's Church built in 1822 on the site of an older church on the Hill of Tara.

Interior of St. Patrick's Church built in 1822 on the site of an older church on the Hill of Tara.

Statue of St Patrick outside of St. Patrick's Church built in 1822 on the site of an older church on the Hill of Tara.

Statue of St Patrick outside of St. Patrick's Church built in 1822 on the site of an older church on the Hill of Tara.

Entrance to Slane Castlein the Boyne Valley of County Meath, Ireland. The castle has been the family home of the Conyngham family since the 18th century.

Entrance to Slane Castlein the Boyne Valley of County Meath, Ireland. The castle has been the family home of the Conyngham family since the 18th century.

Classically attractive residence seen on the way from the Hill of Tara to Newgrange in Slane, Ireland.

Classically attractive residence seen on the way from the Hill of Tara to Newgrange in Slane, Ireland.

We had lunch at the Newgrange Farm and Coffee Shop where they had a pigeon "loft".

We had lunch at the Newgrange Farm and Coffee Shop where they had a pigeon "loft".

We had lunch at the Newgrange Farm and Coffee Shop where they had lots of friendly cats.

We had lunch at the Newgrange Farm and Coffee Shop where they had lots of friendly cats.

South face of Newgrange (Sí an Bhrú) built during the Neolithic period around 3000 BC to 2500 BC with the entrance to the right.

South face of Newgrange (Sí an Bhrú) built during the Neolithic period around 3000 BC to 2500 BC with the entrance to the right.

Looking east across the Boyne Valley with standing stones in front of the entrance to Newgrange in the foreground.

Looking east across the Boyne Valley with standing stones in front of the entrance to Newgrange in the foreground.

An unexcavated but protected mound in the Valley of the Boyne just to the southeast of Newgrange.

An unexcavated but protected mound in the Valley of the Boyne just to the southeast of Newgrange.